Federal Office of Bundeswehr Equipment, Information Technology and In-Service Support

The Federal Office of Bundeswehr Equipment, Information Technology and In-Service Support ( Bundesamt für Ausrüstung, Informationstechnik und Nutzung der Bundeswehr ; BAAINBw ) is located in Koblenz, Rhineland-Palatinate and directly reports to the Federal Ministry of Defense (Germany) located in Bonn and Berlin . [1] It is assigned to the task of equipping the German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) with modern weapon systems considering cost efficiency aspects. In doing so, it is responsible for developing, assessing and procuring weapon systems. It was founded in 2012 by merging both Bundesamt für Wehrtechnik und Beschaffung ( BWB ) and Bundesamt für Informationsmanagement und Informationstechnik ( BWI ) with the goal of producing synergies . [2] Among others, the Bundeswehr Technical and Airworthiness Center for Aircraft is an important branch of the agency. Read More…

Free Voters

Free Voters ( German : Freie Wähler , FW or FWG) in Germany may belong to an association of persons which participates in an election without having the status of a registered political party . Usually it involves a local organized group of voters in the form of a registered association (eV) . In most cases, Free Voters campaign at the local government , standing for city ​​councils and for mayoralties. Free Voters tend to achieve their most successful electoral results in rural areas of southern Germany. Free Voter groups are active in all German states . Read More…

Lied der Partei

The “Song of the Party” ( German : das Lied der Partei ), Also Known As “Die Partei hat immer recht” (English: The Party is always right ) Was the party song of the Socialist Unity Party of Germany , the ruling party of East Germany . It was written by Louis Fürnberg . It is best known by the first line of its chorus : Die Partei, die Partei, die hat immer recht (English: The Party, the Party, is always right ). Read More…

West Berlin state election, 1950

Early elections to the Berlin House of Representatives were held on 3 December 1950. In October 1950 Germany’s new constitution went into force in West Berlin which made the election required. This is the first election to the new Berlin House of Representatives as opposed to the City Council.

The top candidate of the SPD was the popular mayor Ernst Reuter , but Franz Neumann; The CDU nominated Walther Schreiber . The SPD had considerable losses, dropping 19.8 percentage points in just two years, however they still received 44.7% of the vote and were far from the largest party. The main reason for the SPD has been lost because of the tension in the state of the world. The CDU gained 5.3 percentage points to win 24.7% of the vote. The FDP won surprisingly high 23.0% of the vote. Read More…

Stahlhelm-Fraktion

Stahlhelm-Fraktion Gold Steel Helmet-Faction is the hard-line or right-wing faction of a political party , most notably the German CDU . [1] [2] [3] [4] The term refers to the hawkish, ie pro-military positions often taken by such groups and comes from the Stahlhelm , the steel helmet historically used by German soldiers. It was originally used of pro-military extremist politicians in Weimar Republic who were members of the Stahlhelm, Bund der Frontsoldaten . [5] Read More…

Stadtbezirk

Stadtbezirk is a form of German city ​​district , an administrative unit within a larger city. In Germany Stadtbezirke usually only has a metropolis with more than 150,000 inhabitants.

For example, Wattenscheid , which was a town in its own right until 1974, is now a Stadtbezirk within the city of Bochum in the Ruhr area of North Rhine-Westphalia . Read More…

Shame of Gaeta

Shame of Gaeta (‘Schande von Gaeta’) was the name given by the Nazi propaganda to the outcome of an extraterritorial vote during the referendum on the annexation of Austria ( Anschluss ) in 1938. In historical literature, the expression is sometimes used with quotation marks. In stark contrast to the overall result, the unhindered vote to a strong rejection of the Anschluss. Read More…

Prussian Secret Police

The Prussian Secret Police ( German : Preußische Geheimpolizei ) was the political police agency of the German state of Prussia in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

In 1851 Police Union of German States Was set up by the Police Forces of Austria , Prussia, Bavaria , Saxony , Hanover , Baden , and Württemberg . It has been specifically organized in the wake of the 1848 revolutions which spread across Germany. For the next fifteen years the Union is holding annual meetings to exchange information. Karl Ludwig Friedrich von Hinckeldey , the Police Commissioner of Berlin , was appointed by King Friedrich Wilhelm IV on November 16, 1848. He was a key figure in the development of thesecret police in Prussia as well as the whole union. By 1854, thanks to his close relationship with the king he was appointed Generalpolizeidirektor (General Director of Police). Effectively he was a minister of police independence from the minister of the interior. Von Hinckeldey founded the Berlin political police in Berlin and developed a Prussian information catalog on political opponents, focusing on the revolutionaries involved in the 1848 uprisings. But as he saw Paris and London as the center of political intrigue he was keen to organize the policing of political opponents outside borders of national jurisdictions. Read More…

Political culture of Germany

The political culture of Germany as of the early 21st century is known for the popular expectation of governments and social responsibility , business and labor corporatism and a multiparty system dominated by conservative and social democratic forces, with a strong influence of smaller Green , liberal and socialist parties. Coalition gouvernements are predominant on Both the federal and the state level exemplifying the German desire for consensus politics INSTEAD of one party majority rule as in Democracies That follow the Westminster model. Although this consensus is in favor of political participation and political decision making. Political decision making is more complicated by the powers held by the German states and the presence of a judicial branch with the power to review and dismiss legislation. Therefore political power in Germany is not concentrated in the hands of one or a small number of individuals but spread thinly. Even the Chancellor can only set the general guidelines for federal policies ( Richtlinienkompetenz ) and has to negotiate with many other politicians and interest groups when there is a need to take concrete measures. Read More…

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